by Frank A. Aukofer

It’s tempting to describe the 2021 Audi RS 7 in disparate ways: a hair-trigger pistol in a silk holster. An explosive creampuff. An iron fist in a velvet glove.

They are all accurate, more or less. This four-door fastback, so low slung a five-footer can peer over the top, can be driven as softly as a cushy limousine or as harshly as a track or road racer without adjusting anything except the pressure of the right foot on the accelerator pedal.

It extracts gobs of power from its twin-turbo 4.0-liter V8 engine: 591 hp and 590 lb-ft of torque, enough to launch it to 60 mph north or south of three seconds. Top speed on the test car was 155 but the capability can be increased to 190 if you order the optional track-capable carbon ceramic brakes.

Power gets to all four wheels via an eight-speed automatic transmission and Audi’s quattro all-wheel drive system. The transmission can be manually shifted with steering-wheel paddles, though there are likely few humans who could beat the automatic.

Even without the carbon-ceramic grabbers, Car and Driver magazine reported that its testers were able to haul the 4,947-pound RS 7 to a stop from 70 mph in 171 feet, which it judged as impressive. In short, this hatchback sedan is the whole nine yards.

Fuel economy, given the power available, is respectable. City/highway/combined EPA numbers are  15/22/17 miles to the gallon, though to get maximum performance and economy, premium gasoline is required.

There are no different versions, or trim levels. The one you get has a starting price of $115,045. With options, the tester’s bottom-line sticker came to $125,140. If you want something less intimidating, check out the Audi S 7 and A 7. 

What you get for the money, besides the scintillating performance, are luxury accouterments. The tested RS 7 had beautiful perforated and embossed leather upholstery covering supportive and comfortable seats with good bolstering to hold the torso in place. 

In back, the outboard seats are positioned way down to afford head room under the low roof, making it a bit awkward for some people to access. Comfort back there, however, is available only for two. The center-rear seat is a hard perch aggravated by a large floor hump, so the poor soul must splay feet on both sides. It’s not a place for even a short trip.

But there’s a modicum of practicality lurking among the luxurious appointments. Open the rear hatch and access 25 cubic feet of cargo space. Fold the rear seatbacks nearly flat and the cargo area almost doubles. However, despite the sharply angled backlight, there is no rear window wiper. 

The RS 7 comes with full safety equipment, as well as a comprehensive digital gauge cluster that includes instant readouts for power and torque. The infotainment system operates with touch screens that unfortunately require a firm touch to operate, which means the driver can be distracted to aim fingers accurately. But there’s also voice recognition. Navigation, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are included, along with wireless smart phone charging. A subscription Wi-Fi hot spot  is available.

The RS 7 has impeccable manners, whether tootling around downtown, commuting to the suburbs or rocketing around curves on a deserted mountain roadway. As noted, the power is on tap for any circumstance, yet you can feather-foot the throttle for docile motoring in comfort.

Buttressing this package is an adaptive air suspension and four-wheel steering. Both contribute to the controlled ride and confident handling. The tester had an optional driver assistance package that included a head-up display, adaptive cruise control with lane-keeping assist, rear cross-traffic alert, traffic sign recognition and Audi’s intersection assist, which monitors cross traffic.

The tested RS 7 came with an optional exterior black optics package, black outside mirror housings, summer performance tires on 22-inch matte titanium wheels, and red brake calipers. There also was a $500 sport exhaust system, which this reviewer could have done without.

Fortunately, the exhaust notes are most raucous under hard acceleration. In more sedate motoring, the RS 7 runs quietly enough to allow easy listening to the 19-speaker Bang & Olufsen audio system and the SXM satellite radio.

Whether you’re entranced by the whole nine yards, the complete ball of wax or the full megillah, the Audi RS 7 will suit up.

Specifications

  • Model: 2021 Audi RS 7 four-door hatchback sedan.
  • Engine: 4.0-liter V8, turbocharged; 591 hp, 590 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Eight-speed automatic with manual shift mode and all-wheel drive.
  • Overall length: 16 feet 5 inches.
  • EPA/SAE passenger/cargo volume: 95/25 cubic feet.
  • Weight: 4,947 pounds.
  • Height: 4 feet 8 inches.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 15/22/17. Premium gasoline required.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $115,045.
  • Price as tested: $125,140.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Photos (c) Audi