by Frank A. Aukofer

Though it’s among the runners-up for pure driving pleasure, the 2021 Infiniti Q50 can satisfy almost anyone who enjoys driving for its own sake. 

Most of those enthusiasts likely would concede that the best vehicles for their preferred pursuit are sports cars. However, it’s a tradeoff because they have limitations of two seats and truncated luggage space.

The runners-up are compact and midsize sports sedans like the Q50 Signature Edition tested for this review. Many aficionadoes even prefer them for their additional space for up five passengers and the capability to accommodate luggage in a trunk or under a rear hatch.

Examples of the Q50’s competition are the Audi A4 and A5, as well as their higher performance S and RS models; BMW 3-Series and M versions; Mercedes-Benz C-Class and AMG models; Alfa-Romeo Giulia; Cadillac CT-4, CT-5, and Blackwing versions; Acura TLX; Honda Civic Type R; Genesis G70; Subaru BRZ, and Volkswagen Golf GTI/R.

There even are subcompacts that qualify as sports sedans, as witness the Audi A3, S3, and a current favorite here, the Audi RS3, about as sweet a driver as you’ll find anywhere. However, it has a price tag north of $65,000.

The 2021 Infiniti Q50 is not quite as dear. But the tested Signature Edition checked in at $52,800, which included $1,575 worth of options: exterior “welcome lighting,” rear USB charging ports, trunk area enhancements and premium paint.

Sports sedan qualifications start with the Q50’s 3.0-liter V6 engine with twin turbochargers that punches out 300 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque. A seven-speed automatic transmission sends the power to all four wheels. There’s a manual shift mode, but curiously no steering-wheel paddles. You shift with the shifter.

Standard equipment includes most everything a customer might want. Safety items include emergency braking and collision warning, backup collision intervention, blind-spot and lane-departure warning, around-view camera with moving-object detection, adaptive cruise control and hill start assist. 

Convenience and comfort features include dual-zone automatic climate control, perforated leather upholstery, remote engine starting, motorized glass sunroof, rain-sensing windshield wipers, heated outside mirrors, and LED headlights and fog lights.

Inside, the Q50 displays a comfortable ambiance with quality materials and workmanship. The black dash is highlighted with yellow stitching. Over-and-under center touch screens handle navigation and infotainment functions. Buttons control climate functions. Instruments feature big analog displays that are easy to read day or night. 

On the road, the Q50 delivers a comfortable ride, which might be its main drawback. It seems as if the suspension tuning and tires were set up more toward the luxury than the sport side of the spectrum. That’s not to say it’s a slug on handling. It goes where you point it with good steering feedback; its turn-in on sharp curves at high speeds is not as quick as some of the competition. But it is  companionable as a daily driver.

Independent tests place the Q50’s zero-to-60-mph acceleration time in the five-second range — certainly acceptable in this era. The Environmental Protection Agency rates the city/highway/combined fuel consumption at 19/27/22 mpg.

Front seats deliver support and comfort for spirited driving, with good bolstering to hold the torso in place. The back seats offer welcoming accommodations for two in the outboard seats. But as usual in most cars with rear-wheel or all-wheel drive, the Q50’s center-rear seat—there to qualify it for five passengers — should be reserved for knapsacks or capuchin monkeys. Any comfort is compromised by a giant floor hump, intrusion of the center console and a cushion so hard and high the poor passenger’s noggin bumps the headliner-covered metal roof.

Though the Q50 looks like a compact, it has midsize interior space as defined by the EPA. There’s 100 cubic feet for passengers with a trunk of 14 cubic feet, well carpeted to avoid damaging any contents. There’s no spare so figure on calling for help if there’s a flat. 

The Q50’s design with a traditional trunk provides a template that enables stylists. Though not a neck-snapping head turner, this well-designed machine qualifies as eye candy. However, in this view it also could be an Audi-style fastback with a hatchback to enhance the utility side of the equation even further without affecting the performance personality.

Like other manufacturers, Infiniti concentrates on its crossover sport utility vehicles as sedans fade in the marketplace. The Q50 is the company’s sole surviving four-door sedan. But it’s still a worthy competitor.

Specifications

  • Model: 2021 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition four-door sedan.
  • Engine: 3.0-liter V6, twin turbochargers; 300 hp, 295 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Seven-speed automatic with manual shift mode and all-wheel drive.
  • Overall length: 15 feet 10 inches.
  • EPA/SAE passenger/trunk volume: 100/14 cubic feet.
  • Weight: 4,025 pounds.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 19/27/22 mpg.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $51,225.
  • Price as tested: $52,800.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Photos (c) Infiniti