by Frank A. Aukofer

The 2017 Infiniti Q50 3.0 Sport illustrates what can happen to a pioneering car that leads the race but others catch up.

When it was introduced as a 2014 model, the Q50, especially in its S, or Sport iteration with all-wheel drive, was in the vanguard with new technology that placed it on the threshold of a self-driving car.

2018 INFINITI Q50

In fact, with its radar cruise control and direct adaptive steering (DAS), working seamlessly with a lane control system, the Q50 could be driven on a freeway with the driver’s hands off the steering wheel and feet resting comfortably away from the pedals. In fact, a test car driven for the 2014 model’s DriveWays review functioned perfectly that way in more than 10 miles of freeway driving.

DAS uses a drive-by-wire technology that sends the driver’s inputs to the steering wheel directly to the rack that turns the front wheels. The lane control system uses sensors to read lines on the road. If the car drifts to the left or right, the DAS keeps it in the lane. It also works to keep the car tracking around curves.

At the time, the Q50 was the only car that steered back into the lane. Other manufacturers mainly used computerized selective wheel braking. Simultaneously, the radar cruise control maintained a distance from the car ahead, down to a stop.

2018 INFINITI Q50

Both of those enhancements continue on the 2017 Q50 3.0T Sport AWD. The difference is that its competitors, along with some less expensive automobiles, have caught up and now have similar systems. The Q50 also has predictive front collision warning that not only monitors the car ahead but the one in front of that. If it senses a possible collision, it will slam on the brakes to avoid the impact. It also will warn the driver and automatically apply the brakes when the car is moving in reverse and another vehicle crosses its path. Infiniti claims reverse braking as a world first technology.

One thing has changed on all cars with lane departure mitigation: If a driver now decides to try hands-free driving, he receives visual or aural warnings to get his hands back on the wheel. It’s an obvious safety feature, even on the 2017 Q50 Sport. So, there’s no opportunity now to let the car drive itself.

2018 INFINITI Q50

The 2017 Q50 Sport’s midsize package mimics the 2014 model. It is the same length with almost the same passenger and trunk space, seats four comfortably (the center-rear passenger is severely disrespected) and delivers comparable performance.

However, there’s a new engine: a 3.0-liter V6 with twin turbochargers that delivers 300 horsepower. That’s a bit less than the 2014’s 3.7-liter naturally aspirated V6, which had 328 horsepower. However, the fuel economy of the 2014 and 2017 models is identical at 19/27/22 miles to the gallon in city/highway/combined driving.

If you’re the sort of enthusiast who wants even more punch, Infiniti offers the Q50T Red Sport model, which squeezes 400 horsepower from the 3.0-liter V6.

2018 INFINITI Q50

As before, the transmission is a seven-speed automatic with a manual shift mode controlled by paddles mounted on the steering column — a superior setup to those on the steering wheel itself because the paddles are always in the same place no matter where the wheel is turned.

The price has dropped from the 2014 S model, which had a starting sticker of $49,905 and, with options, checked in at $56,545. For the 2017 Q50 Sport model, Infiniti suggests a starting price of $47,555. With options, the version tested for this review came to $55,520.

On the road, the midsize Q50T AWD performs competitively with other sports sedans in its class. Most are classified as compacts by the EPA and, like the Q50, have rear-wheel drive with optional all-wheel drive. Among them: Jaguar XE, BMW 330i, Mercedes-Benz C300 and Lexus IS. Others, which have front- or all-wheel drive, are the Acura TLX and Audi A4.

2018 INFINITI Q50

An entry luxury car, the 2017 Sport comes with a long list of standard equipment, including LED headlights, taillights and daytime running lights; dual-zone automatic climate control; leather upholstery; memory settings for the power tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel and power front seats; SXM satellite radio; rain-sensing windshield wipers, and a motorized glass sunroof.

Options included a rear camera with overhead viewing (which Infiniti was first to offer), radar cruise control, blind-spot warning, and the aforementioned lane departure mitigation and radar cruise control.

2018 INFINITI Q50 makes its North American debut at the 2017 New

Specifications

  • Model: 2017 Infiniti Q50 3.0t Sport AWD four-door sedan.
  • Engine: 3.0-liter V6, twin turbochargers; 300 hp, 295 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Seven-speed automatic with manual shift mode and all-wheel drive.
  • Overall length: 15 feet 8 inches.
  • EPA passenger/trunk volume: 101/14 cubic feet.
  • Weight: 3,996 pounds.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 19/27/22 mpg. Premium required.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $47,555.
  • Price as tested: $55,520.

Disclaimer: This test drive was conducted at a manufacturer-sponsored press event. The manufacturer provided travel, accommodations, vehicles, meals and fuel.

2018 INFINITI Q50

Photos (c) Infiniti.