Search

The Review Garage

Rating the best and worst in cars, SUVs, trucks, motorcycles, tools and accessories.

Tag

Muscle Cars

2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody: A DriveWays Review…

by Frank A. Aukofer

Call them the brute and the ballet master. They are the 2020 Dodge Charger Widebody models: the SRT Hellcat and the Scat Pack.

No tutus allowed, they were introduced in full roar in wine country, California, around Napa Valley and at the Sonoma Raceway near the city of the same name. It is 2.5 miles and a dozen of sometimes blind corners and 160 feet of elevation changes.

2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody

Dodge has a Challenger lineup as well but nobody can challenge the fact that this automaker is the champion of mass-produced performance cars, including the Hellcat, the fastest four-door you can find.

Not that we have to tell Dodge enthusiasts, but the SRT Hellcat V8 pumps out 707 hp and can nail 60 mph in 3.6 seconds and the quarter mile in 10.96 seconds, with a top speed of 196 mph. Those are Dodge specs, but who’s to argue?

That’s the brute. The ballet master is the Scat Pack, powered by the 6.4-liter (392 cubic inches) Hemi V8 engine that delivers 485 hp and 475 lb-ft of torque, enough to hit 60 mph in 4.3 seconds and the quarter-mile in 12.4 seconds.

New aggressive and modern Widebody exterior, optional on Charger Scat Pack features new front and rear fascias with integrated fender flares, adding 3.5 inches of width over the wider wheels and tires.

It is the focus here as the most affordable and best handling of the two, though the tester had a base price of $41,490 and a bottom-line sticker price of $58,245. But never mind. There are plenty of other Chargers for other income brackets, including a basic SXT model that looks almost the same for $31,390, including the destination fee.

Both the $71,140 Hellcat and the Scat Pack came with the Widebody package, which adds fender flares and 20-inch wheels that are 11 inches wide. The treatment stretches the Widebody models to a width of 6 feet 6 inches at the haunches.

Powering the 2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody is the naturally aspirated 392 cubic-inch HEMI® V-8 with best-in-class 485 horsepower

It’s reminiscent of 1959, when Pontiac introduced its Wide-Track models. The idea was to stress stability and handling, though there were few decent handling U.S. cars in the 1950s and 1960s. As race driver and entrepreneur Carroll Shelby once opined: “Great motors. Couldn’t turn, couldn’t stop.”

That cannot be said any more of American muscle cars, and the 2020 Charger Scat Pack Widebody is the prime example. Though it is nearly 17 feet long and weighs 385 pounds more than two tons, it is one of the sweetest handling machines you can find.

The 2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody features an available new leather flat-bottom steering wheel

With the driver cosseted in well-bolstered suede sport seats that grip the torso, aided by well-weighted power steering, sport suspension upgrades and sticky tires on the 20X11-inch wheels, the Scat Pack Widebody calmly gobbles curves and corners on the road and race track.

Though you can use the steering-wheel mounted paddle shifters, there’s no need. The eight-speed automatic transmission picks the proper gear for the situation all by itself. And Brembo performance disc brakes engineered by Dodge stop the Scat Pack Widebody in 107 feet from 60 mph, according to the manufacturer’s specifications.

Beyond its menacing stance, the newly designed front fascia on the Charger Scat Pack Widebody includes a new mail-slot grille, providing the most direct route for cool air to travel into the radiator, to maintain ideal operating temperature even in the hottest conditions.

One principle behind all the Charger models, as expressed by the Dodge boys, is to provide a four-door sedan that a family can drive from coast to coast but also delivers exhilarating performance.

But if you do plan to undertake long-distance travel, the Scat Pack Widebody may not be the choice unless you enjoy the constant burbling of a powerful V8 engine. You can mitigate it somewhat because the Scat Pack has five selectable driving modes, the noisiest of which is the Sport setting, which holds transmission shifts to higher rpms. Better to select one of the more sedate, even economical, modes.

2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody features Scat Pack Bee badge on the deck lid

Classified as a large car by the federal government because of its interior volume, the Scat Pack Widebody has 105 cubic feet for passengers and a big, well-finished trunk of 17 cubic feet. There was no spare wheel, likely to aid front to rear weight distribution. An air pump nestled beneath the trunk floor.

For traveling, the back seat is comfortable for only two. The center-rear passenger must contend with a hard cushion, giant floor hump and intrusion of the center console.

2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody

The Widebody models are distinguished by a so-called mail slot grille with openings designed to enhance brake and engine cooling. The fender flares accommodate the wide tires.

Mark Trostle, Fiat Chrysler’s head of performance, passenger and utility vehicle design, described the new Hellcat and Scat Pack Widebody models: “The goal was to make them badass, intimidating and timeless.”

There’s no argument here.

2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody

Specifications

  • Model: 2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody four-door sedan.
  • Engine: 6.4 liter (392 cubic inches) V8; 485 hp, 475 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Eight-speed automatic with manual-shift mode and rear-wheel drive.
  • Overall Length: 16 feet 9 inches.
  • Width: 6 feet 6 inches.
  • EPA/SAE passenger/trunk volume: 105/17 cubic feet.
  • Weight: 4,385 pounds.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: Est. 15/24/18 mpg. Premium fuel.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $41,490.
  • Price as tested: $58,245.

Disclaimer: This test drive was conducted at a manufacturer-sponsored press event. The manufacturer provided travel, accommodations, vehicles, meals and fuel.

2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody in F8 Green exterior color with Satin Black Painted hood, roof and deckli.

Photos (c) FCA North America

2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt: A DriveWays Review…

by Frank A. Aukofer

Nostalgia and heroic performance come wrapped in a pretty, pulsating package called the 2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt.

The Bullitt is not unlike one of those Beatles tribute bands, except it makes different music from exhaust pipes. It also comes from the same source — Ford Motor Co. — that birthed the star of the 1969 movie. The other star was actor Steve McQueen as Lt. Frank Bullitt of the San Francisco police department.

2019 Mustang Bullitt

Ford delivered two 1968 Mustang fastbacks for the filming, which included a storied episode of McQueen chasing bad guys in a 1968 Dodge Charger, who came to a fiery end. The Mustangs — one still survives — were modified with stronger springs, Koni racing shock absorbers and modest customizing by removing identifying badges.

So goes the 2019 model. It has smooth, flowing lines that make you want to caress it like a newborn, accented by a black hole of a grille. The event horizon paint is the original 1968 Highland Green, the only color offered and only on the Bullitt.

Bullitt’s sensuous body is bereft of ornamentation. Not a Mustang or Ford emblem mars the curvy surface. Only the Bullitt name, in a circle that evokes a target, graces the backside and beckons followers.

2019 Mustang Bullitt

The 1968 Bullitt Mustang was powered by a 320-hp, 6.4-liter V8 engine that made 427 lb-ft of torque. The four-speed manual gearbox and clutch were heavy-duty parts from Borg Warner, and the steering wheel came from a Shelby Mustang.

Contemporary tests put the zero-to-60 acceleration time at just over five seconds with a quarter-mile time of about 13 seconds. Top speed was well into three digits, depending on the tester.

Over the years after the turn of the millennium, Ford produced optional Bullitt packages to somewhat mimic the original. But the 2019 Bullitt, 50 years after the movie if you can imagine that, is the monument on the mountain top.

2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt

No automobile is perfect or flawless, but any high performance machine should be true to its purpose. The 2019 Bullitt is such a machine in conception and execution.

Its 5.0-liter V8 engine spits 480 hp and 420 lb-ft of torque with a cacophony of sounds through the minimally restrictive exhaust system, making certain that the occupants understand what it is about. The muscular clutch and six-speed manual gearbox require strength and finesse that become relaxed and easy with familiarity. This is a machine that grows on you and you on it.

The 2019 Bullitt Mustang shaves about a second off the 1968’s zero-to-60 time, in the four-second range, with a top speed over 160 mph. But that’s not the point in modern traffic. In the famous daylight chase in the movie, San Francisco’s streets were mostly empty. Now you’d be unlikely to duplicate that at 3 a.m. on a weekend.

2019 Mustang Bullitt

Yet even in traffic, the Bullitt delivers tactile sensations: the smooth feel of the round ball on the shift lever, the progressive uptake of the clutch, the positive moves of the shift linkage aided by uncanny automatic rev-matching on downshifts, the blasting exhaust notes.

When the road clears, punch the pedal in second or third gear and experience the adrenaline rush as the Bullitt takes hold of your body and pins you in the seat. Too bad you can’t do it every time because of traffic.

But the Bullitt is docile enough to be perfectly happy noodling along around town in second, third or fourth gears. You know the hammer is there if you want or need it.

2019 Mustang Bullitt

With its tidy dimensions, honking V8 power, quick steering, compliant suspension system and performance tires, the Bullitt delivers joyful feedback any time you can find a twisting mountain road with minimal traffic. Think Skyline Drive in Virginia or the Blue Ridge Parkway. You don’t even have to go very fast to enjoy the moments.

Though the Bullitt Mustang has seats for four, it’s best to think of it as a two-seater — or what used to be called a “plus two” with mostly useless back seats. The rear seatbacks fold down to augment the trunk space, which is surprisingly generous considering the fastback design.

2018 NAIAS

As a high-performance sports car, the Bullitt delivers something of a bargain. The base price of the test car was $47,490, including the destination charge. With a few options, including Ford’s MagneRide shock absorbers, which deliver a comfortable ride but stiffen up for quick maneuvering, the bottom-line sticker came to $51,920.

Ford markets more powerful Mustangs. But none with the character and appeal of the Bullitt.

2019 Mustang Bullitt

Specifications

  • Model: 2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt two-door sports coupe.
  • Engine: 5.0-liter V8; 480 hp, 420 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Six-speed manual.
  • Overall length: 15 feet 9 inches.
  • EPA passenger/trunk volume: 83/14 cubic feet.
  • Weight: 3,850 pounds.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 15/24/18 mpg.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $47,495.
  • Price as tested: $51,920.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

2019 Mustang Bullitt

Photos (c) Ford

2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye: A DriveWays Review…

by Frank A. Aukofer

Tamworth, N.H – With its unrivaled new 2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye and a slew of other bulked up coupes, it looks as if Dodge intends to overpower the market for muscle cars.

Counting the Redeye, the company now offers nine brawny Challenger pony cars, including a purpose-built drag racer and others with all-wheel drive, that cover an affordability spectrum aimed at enthusiasts of modest means to those with big bucks.

2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody

The focus at the Club Motorsports 2.1-mile road racing course here was on two new Challengers: the R/T Scat Pack Widebody and the pinnacle, the new SRT Hellcat Redeye, which Dodge touts as “the most powerful, quickest and fastest muscle car” in the world.

Numbers testify to the claim. The Redeye is a step up from the Hellcat, which itself is a more powerful version of the original SRT Hellcat. It astonished enthusiasts in 2015 with a 707-hp, 6.2-liter supercharged V8 engine that sent 650 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheels.

The 2019 Hellcat gets a bump from the same basic engine to 717 hp and 656 lb-ft of torque. But the Redeye, with its supercharged 6.2-liter V8, revs up 797 hp, or 80 more than the regular Hellcat — if any of these machines could be called regular. Torque jumps to 707 lb-ft.

2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye Widebody

Two transmissions are offered on the Hellcat: a six-speed manual gearbox with a twin-disc clutch or a beefy eight-speed automatic transmission. The Redeye comes only with an even stronger eight-speed automatic with a manual-shift mode controlled by paddles on the steering wheel.

As laps on the racetrack here demonstrated, however, the paddles likely will prove superfluous to most drivers because the eight-speed’s shift points are so computer-calibrated that the driver can forget about shifting and focus on picking fast lines through the curves.

Besides the Hellcat Redeye, the Dodge girls and boys offered track drives in the Challenger R/T Scat Pack, which gets its power from a 485-hp, 6.4-liter V8 with 475 lb-ft of torque. It is available with both the eight-speed automatic transmission and a six-speed manual gearbox, one of which was at the track.

2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye Widebody

Interestingly, the Scat Pack had a stiffer suspension system than the Hellcat Redeye, which enabled it to finesse curves that the Redeye, with some slight body lean, overwhelmed with raw power.

Another distinguishing characteristic of the Redeye: docile manners in low-speed cruising. Though a driver can trigger an explosion under the hood by slamming the gas pedal, rocketing to 60 miles an hour in slightly more than three seconds, the Redeye casually acts like your grandmother’s Toyota Camry in downtown traffic.

Both Hellcats and the R/T Scat Pack can put more rubber on the road with the $6,000 Widebody option package. It includes fender flares and 11-inch wide, 20-inch diameter alloy wheels with 305/35ZR20 all-season performance tires.

2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye Widebody - interior

With full safety equipment, the Widebody’s Brembo brakes and a host of other options that included a 220-mph speedometer, navigation, motorized sunroof, high-performance audio system, leather upholstery and suede trim, the Hellcat Redeye’s $60,045 base price jumped to $88,410. Another version with comfortable and gripping cloth upholstery checked in at $81,331. Both prices include a $1,700 gas guzzler tax.

For less wealthy enthusiasts, Dodge offers the Challenger SXT and GT models, both with rear-drive or all-wheel drive. They are powered by the 305 hp Pentastar V6 engine, with 268 lb-ft of torque and a six-speed manual gearbox or eight-speed automatic transmission. The SXT stick-shift price starts at $28,690 and the GT is $31,390. Add $2,700 for the automatic.

SRT Hellcat Redeye emblem located on the cover of the Supercharged 6.2L HEMI® V-8 engine

The Challenger R/T has a starting price of $35,495 (all prices include the destination charge) and the R/T Scat Pack has a sticker of $41,390, which also includes a $1,000 gas guzzler tax.

No prices were announced for the Challenger R/T Scat Pack 1320, which is a model purpose-built for drag racing. It is intended as a less powerful successor to last year’s limited-production Dodge Demon, which was powered by a supercharged Hemi engine with 840 hp. It enabled the Demon to nail the quarter-mile drag strip in 9.65 seconds.

The Scat Pack 1320 — the number is the number of linear feet in a quarter mile — uses the same Hemi 392 engine as other Scat Pack models. Individual buyers will be able to customize their dragster rides. As with the earlier Demon, the 1320 comes only with a driver’s seat but a front passenger seat and a back seat are available for $1 each.

2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye Widebody

Specifications

  • Model: 2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye two-door coupe.
  • Engine: 6.2-liter V8, supercharged; 797 hp, 707 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Eight-speed automatic with manual-shift mode.
  • Overall length: 16 feet 6 inches.
  • EPA passenger/trunk volume: 94/16 cubic feet.
  • Weight: 4,492 pounds.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 13/22/16 mpg. Premium gasoline required.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $60,045.
  • Price as tested: $88,410.

Disclaimer: This test drive was conducted at a manufacturer-sponsored press event. The manufacturer provided travel, accommodations, vehicles, meals and fuel.

2019 Dodge Challenger Lineup: R/T Scat Pack Widebody, SRT Hellcat Redeye Widebody, SRT Hellcat Widebody (from left to right)

Photos (c) FCA North America

2016 Dodge Challenger SRT 392 Test Drive and Review

by Tod Mesirow

America has a lot of big, open, long, largely empty highways.  Thank you Cold War and President Eisenhower.   The national interstate highway system with the instantly recognizable curved sign, with a number in white on a blue background and the word “INTERSTATE” in white letters on a red background at the top – that’s only 50 years old.   June 29, 1956 is when President Eisenhower signed the law that created the system because of what was felt at the time the strategic necessity of having a coast to coast system of quality roadways – to move troops and equipment in case of war.   The bill actually uses the words “in case of atomic attack.”

Lucky for us the atomic war hasn’t happened yet.  And lucky for us that we have cars like the Dodge Challenger SRT 392 with a 485-hp HEMI V8 and a 6-speed manual transmission driving power to 20-inch wheels controlled through deceleration via Brembo brakes.   With red calipers.   Because the red ones look cool.

dsc_2518-cropped-challengerBut it’s not the stopping that gets our hearts racing.  It’s the going fast.  And the best use of those strategic assets we call “highways” is to go fast in American muscle.

There is the Mustang, and the Camaro, and the Challenger.  Always a little beefier, broader in the shoulders and more imposing in design, the latest iteration of the Challenger was reborn in 2008 after dying in 1974.  After eight years, refinements have been made so that the brawn remains. Yet through some modern technology and effective engineering, there’s a surprising amount bit of nimbleness on hand in the 2016 version.

For me, the really interesting thing about driving this brand new 2016 Challenger SRT 392 is that back in 2013 when I was the Executive Producer of “Joe Rogan Questions Everything” for A. Smith & Co. on SyFy, my friends at FCA loaned us a current (2013) model Challenger SRT with a manual transmission for Joe to drive as his hero car. Which meant (of course) that when Joe wasn’t driving the car, the production department took care of it.  That afforded me a reasonable amount of time behind the wheel.

Powerful?  Yes.  Smooth, responsive, well-mannered?  No.  Out on the Eisenhower highways? Look out.  Roll into some tight turns, switchbacks and two-lane awesomeness? Not so much.

dsc_2502-crop-challengerFast-forward to this August, 2016, when the new 2016 Challenger showed up for me to drive to Monterey Car Week, and then up in to the Sierra Mountains for a few days, I had the perfect opportunity to see and feel for myself if the new upgrades – like the “Bilstein Adaptive Dampening System with an independent front short- and long-arm design and multilink rear design,” according to Dodge promotional materials – had the kind of impact I could feel.

After hundreds of miles, and roads as varied as eight-lane interstate highways to two-lane mountain roads – from the long, flat and straight to the constantly curving, ever-changing in both camber and elevation – the Challenger consistently performed beyond expectations.

dsc_2514-challengerForward visibility is perfect, with the large sweep of windshield glass.  Side-to-side view is fine.  Looking over one’s shoulder is pretty useless – the rear sightlines are limited, and the two best places to look are in the rear-view mirrors or the back-up camera, which catch pretty much everything.  This is an instance of an effective application of modern technology combined with old-school reflection.

Back seat space is minimal.  Like most sports cars, even the ones with 2+2 in their title, it really means the two seats in the back fit one person sitting sideways.  In that configuration most cars of this ilk are effective as three seaters.  The only time four makes sense is when the rear passengers are young, or stars of a TLC little people series. (No offense meant to little people of course.)

dsc_2507-challengerFor long distance driving, the front seats were unexpectedly comfortable.  Controls of all sorts were sensibly placed and well labeled.  The large screen used to control the various systems and the display for the back-up camera is happily touch screen.  (Something Mercedes can’t seem to figure out, in some semblance of obstinacy or feigned Teutonic superiority. But really.  As the control mechanism, the knob is dead. Come on, Mercedes — embrace the touch screen.)

dsc_2509-cropped-challengerDriving the Challenger is a pleasure.  The sonic feedback from the engine has been dialed in just right.  Noise level in the cabin is better than expected. While the engine revs and shifts, the sounds are as tactile as they are auditory in their pleasure.  Diving in and out of curves on a two-lane mountain road in the Sierras, I was able to stay on my side of the road, experience a bit of the thrill of hitting the apex just right, without the sensation of being thrown around in the cabin.  The new suspension set up worked admirably.  For a vehicle with a 4,200-lb curb weight, the thing moved with an unexpected nimbleness.  The hood scoop is functional – air does flow in.  There is no mistaking where the gasoline goes in to the car – the oversized hinged circle says “FUEL” on it in great no-nonsense “here-I-am” fashion – kind of like the car itself.

dsc_2510-cropped-challengerSome cars I get to drive are perfect opportunities to explore a specific type of vehicle, and I’m fine returning them to the manufacturer.  Others stand out as cars that – if I had unlimited funds – would be welcome additions to my stable.  The Dodge Challenger SRT 392 Hemi six-speed definitely fits in that latter class.  I miss it.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Model: 2016 Dodge Challenger SRT 392
  • Price: $50,195 ($52,775 as tested)
  • EPA Fuel Economy: 14 mpg city/23 mpg highway/17 mpg combined
  • Engine: 485 horsepower, 6.4 liter, 392 cubic inch V8 engine
  • Transmission: 6-speed manual
  • Warranty: 3-year/36,000-mile basic; 5-year/60,000-mile powertrain

See Tod’s video review of the 2016 Dodge Challenger SRT 392 here.

dsc_2499-challengerPhotos (c) Tod Mesirow.

 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑