by Frank A. Aukofer

Now a teenager, the 2021 Ford Edge has lost some of its edgy styling in favor of softer attractive styling, but it retains its everyday comfort and practicality as an easy-driving midsize two-row crossover sport utility vehicle.

Introduced as a 2007 model, the Edge has been a staple of the Ford lineup with sales of well over 100,000 most years. It slots between the smaller Escape and the larger Explorer. Four adults sit comfortably and a fifth less so in the center-rear position. But with a nearly flat floor, that person at least has a place to plant his or her feet. Moreover, unlike some luxury SUVs, the rear seatbacks recline for long-trip relaxation.

Behind the second row is a generous cargo area of 39 cubic feet, enough to haul the luggage and stuff for a small family’s week at the beach. A full-size temporary spare wheel and tire is stashed beneath the floor and the rear seatbacks fold 60/40 for extra cargo if needed.

There’s a broad range of trim levels for different budgets and desires, starting with the front-wheel-drive SE at around $33,000 to the top-line ST at more than $45,000. Tested for this review was the mid-level Titanium with all-wheel drive that started at $42,325 and had a bottom-line sticker of $48,990.

All Edge models come with modern basic safety equipment, including automatic emergency braking, lane-keeping assist and blind-spot monitoring. In addition, the tested Edge came with knee air bags up front, evasive steering assist, adaptive cruise control, a reverse sensing system and rain-sensing windshield wipers with de-icing.

Other equipment on the tested Titanium model, some of it optional, included a hands-free motorized rear tailgate, dual-zone automatic climate control, panoramic sunroof, voice-activated navigation, SXM satellite radio, 4G Wi-Fi hotspot, wireless smart phone charging, leather trimmed heated and cooled front seats with power memory driver’s seat, and heated rear seats.

The Edge Titanium infotainment system comes with Ford’s new SYNC 4 interface viewed on a 12-inch center display. It features wireless compatibility with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and apps from smart phones and other mobile devices. 

With that list of equipment, anyone could be forgiven for assuming that the Edge Titanium competes in the near-luxury crossover class. It does, but at a lower price than some of the others.

It shows on the open road, where cruising at freeway speeds and higher is fatigue-free, with few steering corrections needed in straight-line driving. If you’re caught up in stop-and-go traffic, as happens to motorists on the east coast’s Interstate 95 during beach vacation season, it’s another story. 

The cabin is quiet, with little intrusion of mechanical, tire and wind noise. Handling on twisting roads is capable and secure as long as you don’t push the Edge too hard. 

Comfort and ergonomics are first-rate. The seats, done up in perforated leather, are supportive and comfortable, and controls are easy to locate and operate. The shifter is a rotary knob that is as intuitive and easy to use as any shifter currently on the market. There’s an idle stop-start system that, thankfully, can be switched off, eliminating that hesitation if you have to accelerate quickly from a stop.

Except for the top-line ST performance model, the Edge gets its power from a 250-hp turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine that delivers 275 lb-ft of torque. With that, the tested Titanium model is not the quickest crossover out of the gate. But with a 0-60-mph acceleration time of less than seven seconds, it will do nicely. A few years ago, that was considered fast.

The top-line ST performance version is powered by a 2.7-liter V6 engine with twin turbochargers. It makes 335 hp and 380 lb-ft of torque, and comes with all-wheel drive standard. The transmission is an eight-speed automatic for all models.

However, unless you’re the sort who simply must have the most powerful — and least economical — model in any lineup, the Titanium version is more than satisfactory. It does everything buyers look for in a two-row crossover.

Competitors include the Honda Passport, Kia Sorento, Chevrolet Blazer, Hyundai Santa Fe and Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport. The Mazda CX-9 has the same interior space but squeezes in three rows of seats.

Specifications

  • Model: 2021 Ford Edge Titanium four-door crossover sport utility vehicle.
  • Engine: 2.0-liter four-cylinder, turbocharged; 250 hp, 275 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Eight-speed automatic with all-wheel drive.
  • Overall length: 15 feet 9 inches.
  • Height: 5 feet 8 inches.
  • EPA/SAE passenger/cargo volume: 110/39 cubic feet.
  • Weight: 4,124 pounds.
  • Towing capability: 1,500 pounds.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 21/28/23 mpg.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $42,325.
  • Price as tested: $48,990.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Photos (c) Ford