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Hyundai

2022 Hyundai Tucson Limited Hybrid: A DriveWays Review…

by Frank A. Aukofer

Hyundai jumped the gun in the race for buyers of compact crossover sport utility vehicles with its fully redesigned 2022 Tucson, which features eye-catching body sculpting and creative lighting, among many new features.

Moreover, this new contender comes in 10 different versions, called trim levels in the industry, including three hybrids and price tags ranging from $26,135 for the base SE model to $38,704 for the top-line Limited Hybrid version with all-wheel drive tested for this review. Hybrids come with all-wheel drive and other models also are available with front-wheel drive. Prices include the destination charge.

Even with its 38 grand as-tested price, the Tucson Limited Hybrid sells for less than the average price of a new car in the United States — now more than $40,000 — and presents itself more as a small luxury crossover than an economical utility vehicle, which it also can claim.

A crossover is a sport utility vehicle (SUV) built like a car, with unit body construction. An SUV is built with the body mounted on a frame, like a pickup truck. The Tucson is an example of the former; the Chevrolet Tahoe or Jeep Wrangler are traditional rugged SUVs.

Coming or going, the Tucson is a grabber. Its grille is highlighted by 10 (count ’em) LED daytime running lights. Hyundai says the idea was to craft a recognizable work of art. On the road, if a Tucson overtakes your vehicle, you will witness a tail gate that sports a full-width light bar and angular bright brake lights.

For all of its luxury and technological highlights, this Tucson will not disappoint at the gasoline pumps. It delivers a 37/36/37 mpg city/highway/combined EPA fuel economy rating, which some new owners already have exceeded.

The power train consists of a 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine mated to a 90-hp electric motor. Together, they deliver 261 hp and 224 lb-ft of torque to all four wheels via a six-speed automatic transmission, meaning this Tucson will never be embarrassed in the stoplight sprints or freeway wrangling. 

For peace of mind, every Tucson comes with modern safety equipment, including automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection and lane-departure warning with lane-keeping assist. The tested Limited Hybrid also was equipped with adaptive cruise control and lane-following assist, blind-spot warning, driver attention detection and warning, rear occupant alert, rear cross-traffic avoidance alert, and front and rear parking assist warning.

Inside, driver and passengers of the Limited Hybrid are treated to quality materials, well-designed equipment and accents, including perforated leather upholstery, and topped off by a panoramic sunroof. A large center screen handles infotainment functions. However, all controls are either touchscreen or pushbutton. You have to look at the screen to select functions, which could be distracting. A few knobs would be welcome for things like radio volume.

Outboard back seats are big and comfortable with plenty of head room and knee room. However, as usual in too many vehicles, the forlorn center rear passenger gets treated to a hard, high cushion and a big floor hump. 

With the rear seatbacks in place, the tested Tucson had 39 cubic feet of space for cargo, more than any conventional sedan on the market. To nearly double that, simply fold the seatbacks almost flat. There’s no spare wheel under the cargo floor — just a “tire mobility kit.” So, figure on calling for emergency service.

The Tucson Hybrid’s forte is serene distance cruising, with the gasoline engine and electric motor quietly working in concert. But it also is no slouch on twisting roads, though it would be a mistake to assume it handles like a sports sedan. However, with a supple suspension system mated to compatible tires, it is capable and secure with a comfortable ride.

Hyundai also offers a Tucson plug-in hybrid, which can deliver up to 32 miles of purely electric operation. An onboard charger can top up the battery in about two hours with a level two 240-volt connection. But once the electric juice dries up it simply switches to regular hybrid operation, so the current better choice is a standard hybrid like the tester, which doesn’t need to be plugged in.

The new Tucson competes in tough company against the Toyota RAV4, Mazda CX-30, Honda CR-V, Ford Escape, and the Kia Sportage from Hyundai’s sister division. It should prove to be a formidable foe.

Specifications     

  • Model: 2022 Hyundai Tucson Limited Hybrid four-door crossover sport utility vehicle.
  • Engine/motor: 1.6-liter four-cylinder, turbocharged, 180 hp, 195 lb-ft torque; 90 hp electric motor. Total system: 261 hp, 224 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Six-speed automatic with manual shift mode and all-wheel drive.
  • Overall length: 15 feet 2 inches.
  • EPA/SAE passenger/cargo volume: 106/39 cubic feet.
  • Height: 5 feet 6 inches.
  • Weight: 3,695 pounds.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 37/36/37 mpg.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $38,535.
  • Price as tested: $38,704.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Photos (c) Hyundai

2021 Hyundai Palisade Calligraphy: A DriveWays Review…

by Frank A. Aukofer

It’s easy to conclude that Hyundai decided to go over the top with the 2021 Palisade three-row crossover sport utility vehicle. After making its debut as a 2020 model, the Palisade scored plaudits all over the automotive multiverse along with its fraternal cousin, the Kia Telluride. In any number of ratings and reviews, the two crossovers were ranked one and/or two in the midsize, three-row crossover category.

It’s getting to be a familiar story. The two South Korean companies are part of the same family and lately have consistently delivered desirable vehicles with high-grade content and competitive prices. They share engineering, engines, and drive trains but follow their own instincts on styling and other ingredients. 

For the 2021 model year, Hyundai upped the ante with a new top-line trim level, called the Palisade Calligraphy. The former top Limited has been relegated to secondary status along with the less expensive SEL and SE versions.

The Calligraphy, with striking exterior styling highlighted by an intimidating in-your-face grille with triangle accents and eye-catching alloy wheels, has tilted into the luxury category despite its more bourgeois price tag.

Inside, the Calligraphy’s luxurious personality encompasses a variety of quality materials including quilted leather trim on the doors and faux wood accents. Also: perforated leather upholstery and steering wheel; rear side sunshades; heated and ventilated seats; a 10.25-inch touchscreen with navigation, SXM satellite radio, and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

The center console expands the storage area with cup holder surrounds that fold into the console inside and are spring loaded. If you need to secure a cup you simply touch a button, and they snap into place.

Full safety equipment includes automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, rear cross-traffic alert, lane-keeping and lane-following assist, adaptive cruise control, and a clever blind-spot warning system built into the instrument cluster. When you click the left or right turn signal, the rear view on either side shows up, substituting briefly for the speedometer or tachometer.

You can check the blind spots on both sides without looking at the outside mirrors. However, though innovative, the system is unnecessary if you are among the rare motorists who know how to properly adjust the outside mirrors, which are the original blind sport monitors.

The Calligraphy tested for this review carried an opening price tag of $48,935. But it was so well equipped there was only one option: $215 for carpeted floor mats. All-wheel drive is standard. The lesser trim levels, with both front drive or optional all-wheel drive, are the SE, which starts at $33,800 including the destination charge; SEL, at $36,510, and Limited, $46,460.

There’s power aplenty from a 291-hp, 3.8-liter V6 engine that delivers 262 lb-ft of torque, enough to move this 4,387-pound beauty to 60 mph in a snippet under seven seconds, with a top speed of 130 mph. An eight-speed automatic transmission with manual mode and paddle shifters gets the power to the pavement.

There are five selectable drive modes: Comfort, Sport, Eco, Smart, and Snow. Comfort provides a slightly softer ride and Sport delivers slightly crisper handling. But you have to pay close attention to notice the differences. Either works well in everyday driving.

Traveling, the Palisade was an amiable companion. It cruised quietly with confident handling and fatigue-free long-distance motoring, though it’s not particularly anxious to challenge twisting mountain roads.

The tested Calligraphy was a seven-passenger model with generous space and captain’s chairs in the second row. They were as comfortable and supportive as the front seats, with multiple adjustments and enough travel to provide knee room to passengers in the third row. 

The third row sits on a raised platform about four inches higher than the second-row floor. But there’s still enough head room for modest sized humans and knee room if the second-row seats are moved forward. There are three seatbelts back there, but passengers better be skinny or kids. 

Third-row seats have powered reclining and seatback folding. There’s 18 cubic feet for cargo, accessed by a hands-free automatic tailgate, which expands to 46 cubic feet with the third row folded, and 86 cubic feet if you also fold the second row. Headrests drop automatically when you drop the seatbacks.

Besides the Telluride, the Palisade competes handily against the Ford Explorer, Buick Enclave, Mazda CX-9, Volkswagen Atlas, Subaru Ascent, Toyota Highlander, Honda Pilot, and Nissan Pathfinder.

Specifications

  • Model: 2021 Hyundai Palisade Calligraphy four-door crossover sport utility vehicle.
  • Engine: 3.8-liter V6; 291 hp, 262 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Eight-speed automatic with manual shift mode and all-wheel drive.
  • Overall length: 16 feet 4 inches.
  • Height: 5 feet 9 inches.
  • EPA/SAE passenger/cargo volume: 155/18 cubic feet. 
  • Weight: 4,387 pounds.
  • Towing capability: Maximum 5,000 pounds properly equipped.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 19/24/21 mpg.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $48,935.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Photos (c) Hyundai

2021 Hyundai Santa Fe Hybrid Limited: A DriveWays Review…

by Frank A. Aukofer

Though it does not compete in the luxury class of crossover sport utility vehicles, the 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe Hybrid Limited owns some of those attributes, notably a substantial feel and a peaceful cabin on the road.

It’s a midsize four-door with two rows of seats, powered by a 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder gasoline engine and an electric motor that together deliver 226 hp and 258 lb-ft of torque. All-wheel drive is standard.

The new Santa Fe arrives in exceptional company. It slots between Hyundai’s acclaimed larger three-row crossover, the Palisade, and the redesigned 2022 Tucson, a compact which offers its Hybrid model with a power train that is nearly identical to the Santa Fe’s and is priced about $2,500 less comparably equipped. 

The Santa Fe also is a fraternal twin of the Kia Sorento. Hyundai and Kia are sister companies in South Korea, and share engines and transmissions, though each does its own engineering, design and tuning. A Kia Sorento EX Hybrid previously reviewed here came with a nearly identical engine/motor combination. As on the Santa Fe Hybrid, power moves through a six-speed automatic transmission with a manual shift mode operated by steering-wheel paddles. 

The main difference between the two was that the Sorento had front-wheel drive and three rows of seats compared to the Santa Fe’s all-wheel drive and two rows. Other dimensions were within inches between the two vehicles and the Kia’s price tag was about $3,000 lower, mainly because of the Hyundai’s all-wheel drive.

But if a luxury look and feel cranks your motor, the Santa Fe would fit the bill nicely. As noted, it imparts solidity and silence to the driver and passengers, with a tactile steering feel that would not seem alien to a Mercedes-Benz or BMW owner. Handling is secure and competent with little body lean on curves. 

Contributing to the placid driving experience is the Santa Fe’s hybrid drive train, which switches unobtrusively between electric and gasoline power. 

Though the Santa Fe is not the quickest sprinter off the blocks, the electric motor’s instant torque delivers a boost at low speeds, so it is not embarrassed in urban, suburban or freeway traffic. The zero-to-60-mph acceleration time is in the seven-second range, respectable but not outstanding in this era. City/highway/combined fuel consumption is rated by the EPA at 33/30/32 mpg.

The interior exudes stylish quality. On the test car, the upholstery had an attractive combination of black and dark brown perforated and quilted leather and other materials for the upholstery, door trim and dash. Substantial bolstering on the front seat keeps the torso tidily in place. Overhead, a panoramic glass sunroof came with an opaque power shade.

Comfort and support in the outboard rear seats is first rate. But the center seat, despite a nearly flat floor, is still an uncomfortable perch that is high and hard, though roomier than many others. Rear seatbacks recline and fold nearly flat.

The instruments included Hyundai’s signature blind spot warning system. When the turn signals are activated, camera views to the right- or left-rear so-called blind spots are displayed in the instruments. The only drawback is that heavy rain can leave drops on the camera lenses, which partially obscures the view. 

As wonderful as the system is, it is not needed if the driver uses the original blind spot warning system by properly adjusting the inside and outside rear-view mirrors to provide a wide-ranging view behind the vehicle.

The Santa Fe Limited Hybrid’s base price of $41,235 includes almost everything any buyer might want, especially full safety equipment: forward collision assist, blind-spot warning, automatic high headlight beams, rear cross-traffic collision avoidance, driver attention warning, lane-keeping and lane following assist, adaptive cruise control with stop and go, and rear occupant alert.

Other features: Navigation system, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, dual automatic climate control, memory driver’s seat, SXM satellite radio, premium Harman Kardon audio, Bluetooth connectivity, wireless device charging, surround view rear monitor, parking assist, and heated and ventilated front seats.

The only option on the tested Santa Fe was $155 for carpeted floor mats, bringing the as-tested price to $41,290, which now is only about $1,000 more than the average price of a new automobile in the United States.

Specifications

  • Model: 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe Hybrid Limited AWD four-door crossover sport utility vehicle.
  • Engine/motor: 1.6-liter four-cylinder gasoline, turbocharged, 178 hp, 195 lb-ft torque; 59-hp electric motor, 195 lb-ft torque; combined system output 226 hp, 258 lb-ft torque. 
  • Transmission: Six-speed automatic with manual shift mode and all-wheel drive.
  • Overall length: 15 feet 8 inches.
  • EPA/SAE passenger/cargo volume: 112/36 cubic feet. 
  • Height: 5 feet 6 inches.
  • Weight: 4,245 pounds.
  • Towing capability: 2,000 pounds.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 33/30/32 mpg.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $41,135.
  • Price as tested: $41,290.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Photos (c) Hyundai

2021 NACTOY Winners : A DriveWays Report…

by Frank A. Aukofer

With two out of three wins, the Ford Motor Co. dominated the awards Monday, Jan. 11, in the annual North American Car, Truck and Utility Vehicle of the Year honors.

The new all-electric Ford Mustang Mach-E was judged Utility of the Year, and the Ford F-150 pickup won Truck of the Year. The Car of the Year honor went to the all-new Hyundai Elantra from South Korea, a compact sedan that comes in economy, hybrid and performance models.

However, Hyundai’s luxury brand, Genesis, which had finalists in both Car of the Year with its new G80 sedan and Utility of the Year with its crossover SUV, the GV80, did not score a win — though in 2019 its G70 sedan won Car of the Year.

The awards were announced in a news conference from Detroit by officers of NACTOY, the North American Car of the Year organization.

Dating back to 1994, the awards are determined by votes from a panel of 50 automotive journalists, including this reviewer, from the United States and Canada. They are staff members for publications and web sites, as well as free lances. All told, they contribute to a variety of newspapers, magazines, websites, and television and radio stations. 

 Jurors are dues-paying journalist members of NACTOY, and they are required to drive and evaluate all of the nominated vehicles. The awards, according to NACTOY, are the longest-running new-vehicle accolades not associated with a specific newspaper or other publication, website, radio or television. 

It is not a competition as such because manufacturers do not enter vehicles. The NACTOY leadership determines the initial nominees—43 this year — which are required to be substantially new and potential leaders in their classes. 

They are graded on innovation, design, safety, handling, driver satisfaction and value for the dollar. NACTOY members this year winnowed the initial nominations down to 27 and then, in a second vote, named nine semifinalists, three in each category. The third vote determines winners. Votes are tallied by Deloittle LLP and kept secret. 

Finalists this year were the winning Hyundai Elantra for Car of the Year, along with the Genesis G80 four-door and the Nissan Sentra compact sedan. The Elantra garnered 176 votes to 173 for the Genesis G80. In third place was the Sentra with 151.

In the Truck of the Year category, besides the winning Ford F-150, were the Ram TRX, an off-road racer with a Hellcat V8 engine of 702 horsepower, and the Jeep Gladiator Mojave, also an off-roader with racing credentials.  The F-150 ran away with the lead with 340 votes to 130 for the Ram TRX and 30 for the Gladiator Mojave.

Besides the Ford Mustang Mach-E, an electric crossover SUV, finalists for Utility of the Year were the resurrected Land Rover Defender, a luxury SUV from the storied British manufacturer that has been producing all-terrain vehicles since World War II. The Mustang EV led with 265 votes to 136 for the GV80 and 99 for the Defender.

Photos © Ford, Hyundai

What Would 1986 Think of the 2020 Hyundai Elantra?

by Jason Fogelson

I wish I had a time machine. Not so that I could go back in time, but so I could bring a car enthusiast from the past into our present and show them the 2020 Hyundai Elantra Limited. 

Imagine plucking some guy from 1986, the year that Hyundai began selling the Excel in the United States. Imagine this guy with his pleated pants, Hawaiian shirt with the collar popped, and the sleeves of his white linen jacket pushed up his forearms like Don Johnson on Miami Vice. He’s laughing at the Excel in a Hyundai showroom, giggling at the idea that any self-respecting car guy would be caught dead in a Korean car. Suddenly, a beam of light from above captures this guy – let’s call him Chad – and rearranges his molecules through space and time, reconstructing him in the driver’s seat of a 2020 Elantra.

Once the nausea from time travel wears off, Chad looks around the cabin of the Elantra Limited. He’s sure that he’s in a luxury car. I assure him that he’s in a Hyundai Elantra Limited with a list price of $22,800. He whistles at how expensive that is – until I tell him that the average transaction price on a new car in the United States right now is above $35,000, so this is quite clearly an economy car. (In 1986 where Chad is from, the average transaction price for a new car is around $12,500.)  Even with the options on our 2020 Elantra Limited ($3,350 Ultimate Package; $135 Carpeted Floor Mats; $930 Inland Freight and Handling), the as-tested price of the car he’s sitting in is $27,215 – way below average.

Chad nods, looks around and starts touching things. He’s impressed with the design, which is simple and elegant to his eyes. He’s impressed with the eight-inch infotainment touchscreen, and once I explain all of the technology that it gives access to, he nods as if he understands (he really doesn’t, because he’s from 1986). He loves the fact that there’s no key to insert or turn, just a button to push, because he thinks that a key fob will work better in his linen jacket pocket than some jangly keys. He’s thrilled with the controls available on the steering wheel, and when I describe some of the SmartSense safety systems that come with the Limited’s Ultimate Package – Smart Cruise Control, Forward Collision Avoidance Assist with Pedestrian Detection, Safe Exist Assist and Blind Spot Collision Warning with Rear Cross Traffic Alert and Lane Change Assist – he’s amazed and enthralled. It seems like science fiction, but I assure him that it’s science fact. 

As a car guy, he can’t wait to get a look under the hood. He’s a little disappointed by the engine’s size, a 2.0-liter inline four-cylinder gasoline unit. But when I tell him that the little 2.0 can produce 147 hp and 132 lb-ft of torque while achieving 30 mpg city/40 mpg highway/34 mpg combined, he’s ready to take a drive.

Elantra’s Intelligent Variable Transmission (IVT), a new Hyundai take on the continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT), is transparent in operation for Chad, just like a conventional geared automatic transmission, but he’s a little flummoxed by the slightly sluggish performance in “D” mode. I reach over and push the gear selector lever in “S,” and the 2.0 engine perks up immediately, holding gear ratios longer, and livening up performance. Chad pushes the Elantra into curves, tries out the brakes, and puts the car through its paces, a wide grin breaking out on his face. Chad declares the Elantra a winner over all of the economy cars and most of the luxury cars of 1986 – and it’s even comfortable and quiet on the road. 

I have to agree with Chad (after all, I made him up for this story). But how does the Elantra stand up to the competition in 2020? Measure it against the Toyota Corolla, Honda Civic, Nissan Sentra, Mazda3 and Volkswagen Jetta to get an idea. I’d put it near the top rung for value and overall quality, in the lower end for overall driving experience. I prefer the Mazda3 and Jetta for pure driving enjoyment, but I like the Elantra’s packaging and available safety features a lot. 

If you, like Chad, have not experienced the current state of the art in economy/commuter cars, I encourage you to explore the landscape before buying. You’ll be wise to include the 2020 Hyundai Elantra Limited on your list for consideration.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Photos (c) Hyundai

2020 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Ultimate: A DriveWays Review…

by Frank A. Aukofer

If raucous high performance defines motoring excitement for you, consider the 2020 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Ultimate.

This is a compact, front-wheel drive hatchback with midsize room that is distinguished by three passenger doors. There’s a long door for the driver and two shorter doors on the right side. Having the third door is way preferable to squirming into the back seat of a two-door.

Three Doors Open

Though it’s far from a sales standout in Hyundai’s lineup, the Veloster, depending on the version, qualifies as an economy car or all the way up to what some observers like to call a “hot hatch” — that is, a sports car in hatchback metal.

The Veloster has been part of the South Korean manufacturer’s lineup for almost a decade. For 2020, it comes in five trim levels: The base model, at $19,430, including the destination charge, comes with a 147-hp, 2.0-liter engine with 132 lb-ft of torque and a five-speed manual gearbox. Next up is the 2.0 Premium for $23,730, which adds a six-speed automatic transmission and other equipment.

Front 3q Right Dynamic

Both fall into the economy end of the equation, though they offer standard Apple Car Play and Android Auto as well as a suite of safety enhancements. Among them: forward collision mitigation and lane-keeping assist. They are solid, dependable daily drivers.

Move up to the next level and you get the stick shift Turbo R-Spec, which has a sticker of $24,080 and is a blast to drive because of its 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine that makes 201 hp with 195 lb-ft of torque. Get the same power with a dual-clutch seven-speed automatic transmission and the price jumps to $26,380.

Front 3q Left Dynamic

Which brings us to the tested Veloster Turbo Ultimate. It has the same power train as the Turbo DCT but more equipment and a bottom-line sticker price of $29,215. It comes equipped with blind-spot warning, rear cross-traffic alert, lane-keeping assist and automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection,

The dual-clutch seven-speed automatic transmission is part of the Ultimate package. This type of automatic operates something like a manual gearbox but with two clutches alternately poised to engage the next gear instantly, computer controlled unless the driver opts to shift for himself or herself. The advantage is quicker shifts and improved fuel economy.

Dash Daytime

The tested Veloster Turbo Ultimate was gorgeously gussied up with bright red paint topped by a glossy black top. You could argue that it had an arresting presence — likely attracting any police vehicle in sight.

Inside, the effect was similar, with light gray, perforated leather upholstery trimmed with red stripes. The front seats were supportive and comfortable, with seatbacks well bolstered to hold the torso in hard cornering on curving roads. Oddly, though the tester was well equipped, even with a head-up display, the driver’s seat had only manual adjustments.

Second Row

Once you awkwardly work your way through the narrow right rear-door opening, the back seat offered decent head and knee room for average-sized adults.

On the road, the Veloster Turbo Ultimate was a stellar performer. But it might be a good idea to bring along ear plugs or noise-canceling headphones. Combine the racket from the revving turbo engine and road noise stabbing into the cabin, ordinary conversation or listening to audio is off the table.

Profile Right

Still, there’s excitement. With the snap shifts from the dual-clutch transmission, the Turbo Ultimate can nail 60 mph from rest in about six seconds, according to a test by Car and Driver magazine.

The steering is precise and responsive, though with a heavy feel, and communicates what’s going on at the front wheels. However, the ride, on anything but smooth asphalt, is harsh and upsetting.

Hatchback Open

Equipment is extensive. As the top of the lineup, the Veloster Turbo Ultimate came with only one option: $135 carpeted floor mats. Included  were a motorized glass sunroof, 18-inch alloy wheels, navigation system, automatic climate control, premium audio with SXM satellite radio, wireless smart phone charging and LED headlights and tail lights.

Curiously, the Turbo Ultimate actually is not the ultimate Veloster. Hyundai has developed a new N high performance line for some of its models. The designation resembles F-Sport at Lexus, AMG at Mercedes-Benz, V at Cadillac, S at Audi, R-Type at Honda and M at BMW.

The Veloster N comes in two versions: Standard package for $28,530 and Performance package at $30,430. Both have 2.0-liter four-cylinder engines. The Standard makes 250 hp and the Performance has a 275-hp four-banger. That’s the ultimate.

Front Dynamic

Specifications

  • Model: 2020 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Ultimate three-door hatchback.
  • Engine: 1.6-liter four-cylinder, turbocharged with direct injection; 201 hp, 195 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Seven-speed dual-clutch automatic with manual-shift mode and front-wheel drive.
  • Overall length: 13 feet 11 inches.
  • EPA/SAE passenger/cargo volume: 90/20 cubic feet. (44.5).
  • Weight: 2,987 pounds.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 28/34/30 mpg.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $29,080.
  • Price as tested: $29,215.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Rear 3q Left Dynamic

Photos (c) Hyundai

Palisade: The New Three-Row SUV from Hyundai

by Jason Fogelson

The 2020 Hyundai Palisade is an all-new three-row SUV, replacing the Santa Fe XL with a bigger, more powerful, more luxurious SUV. The new name is intended to connote strength, stability and style in a very competitive segment of the marketplace.

Profile Left Sunset

Built in South Korea for the North American market, the Palisade rides on a new platform, and is longer, wider and taller by about three inches in each dimension than the Santa Fe XL that it replaces, and rides on a 114.2-inch wheelbase (four inches longer than Santa Fe XL). It uses a bigger, more powerful V6 engine and an eight-speed automatic transmission, adding two speeds to Santa Fe XL’s capability. Palisade’s interior is more spacious, including 4.5 additional cubic feet behind the third row and an additional inch of third-row legroom. Hyundai has simplified its packaging for Palisade, with a well-equipped base SE model and loaded Limited model bracketing a more configurable mid-trim SEL model, designed to address both value and aspirational buying trends.

Front 3q Right

My top-of-the-line Limited model test vehicle came a dual sunroof, heated and ventilated captain’s seats in the second row (no bench option), premium Nappa leather seating surfaces, a 630-watt Harmon Kardon premium audio system with 12 speakers, QuantumLogic Surround and Clari-Fi Music Restoration Technology, a 12.3-inch full digital display instrument cluster, a head-up display, surround-view monitor, blind-view monitor, and ambient lighting – all standard equipment on the Limited trim level, in addition to the arm-length list of other standard features and the Hyundai SmartSense safety suite. This sucker was loaded – and all of the features, except for an optional ($160) set of carpeted floor mats.

Profile Left

Palisade soaks up miles with ease, remaining composed over rough surfaces and cruising nicely when the roads get twisty. Selectable driving modes include Smart, Normal, Sport, and Snow, adjusting front and rear torque distribution, throttle and shift patterns at the turn of a center-console mounted knob. A heavy foot on the gas pedal induces some thrashy noises from the V6, which is otherwise quiet and smooth. Handling is smooth and composed, and Palisade exuded competence in all situations it faced. It’s really a pleasure to drive, and would make a great family road trip vehicle.

Engine

All Palisade models come with a naturally aspirated (non-turbo) 3.8-liter V6 engine with gasoline direct injection and four valves per cylinder with variable valve timing. Running on the Atkinson Cycle, the V6 puts out 291 hp and 262 lb-ft of torque. An eight-speed shift-by-wire automatic transmission with front-wheel drive or available all-wheel drive puts the power to the ground. Front-wheel drive examples of Palisade are rated to achieve 19 mpg city/26 mpg highway/22 mpg combined, while my all-wheel drive model was rated to achieve 19 mpg city/24 mpg highway/21 mpg combined.

Dash

Palisade is available in three trim levels: SE (starting at $31,550 with FWD, $33,250 with AWD); SEL (starting at $33,500 with FWD, $35,200 with AWD); and Limited (starting at $44,700, $46,400 with AWD). Add $1,045 to each for freight charges. A $2,200 Convenience Package and a $2,400 Performance Package can be added to SEL models, along with some standalone options. My test vehicle was a 2020 Palisade Limited AWD with a list price of $46,400, and an as-tested sticker price of $47,605.

Second RowThe three-row crossover SUV category is very well-stocked right now, including fresh entries like the Ford Explorer, Subaru Ascent, Volkswagen Atlas, and Toyota Highlander. The Mazda CX-9, Honda Pilot, Nissan Pathfinder, GMC Acadia, Chevrolet Traverse, Buick Enclave are also worth consideration. And don’t forget the Kia Telluride, which shares a platform (but no sheet metal) with the Palisade.

Third Row

The 2020 Hyundai Palisade is an elegant, competent, mid-size three-row crossover SUV that is a worthy successor to the Santa Fe XL. If you’re in the market for a new family vehicle, add the Palisade to your list for consideration.

Cargo

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Rear 3q Left

Photos (c) Hyundai

2020 Hyundai Kona EV Ultimate: A DriveWays Review…

by Frank A. Aukofer

As electric vehicles go in 2020, the Hyundai Kona motors at or near the front of the pack.

The Kona EV is a small crossover sport utility vehicle, similar in many respects to the Kia Niro, no surprise because Hyundai owns almost one-third of Kia and the South Korean sister companies share engines and transmissions, though they do their own styling, other engineering and tuning.

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The Hyundai engineers have squeezed about as much power and range as possible from the Kona’s electric motor, which makes 201 hp and 291 lb-ft of torque, sent directly to the front wheels. There’s no need for the torque multiplication of a conventional automatic transmission because electric motors deliver maximum torque the instant they are switched on.

Unlike Kona gasoline-engine models, the EV comes only with front-wheel drive. All-wheel drive is not available. Still, independent tests have demonstrated that the EV is slightly quicker off the line than the Kona with the 175-hp, 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder gasoline engine.

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With a base curb weight of 3,750 lbs, that amount of power enables the Kona to scamper to 60 mph in the six-second range — not bad for what is described as a subcompact sport ute that has interior space of 111 cubic feet. That’s as much as a midsize sedan, though the back seat has a shortage of knee room.

Moreover, it is stingy with natural resources. With no fossil fuels directly involved — the electricity comes off the same grid as the juice that feeds your TV set and kitchen range — the Kona EV is rated by the Environmental Protection Agency as equivalent to 132 mpg fuel economy. And that’s around town. On the highway, the so-called MPGe is 108 and overall the happy owner gets 120 MPGe.

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Better yet, this little scooter is a joy to drive. The 64 kW hour battery pack, which enables an advertised range of 258 miles on a charge, is located under the floor. The lower center of gravity makes for a more stable set around curves, though the weight and suspension tuning makes for a choppy ride on rough surfaces. Of course, the Kona is blissfully silent at any speed.

Part of the reason for the decent range is an aggressive regenerative braking system. When the driver lifts off the throttle, the Kona immediately slows down, feeling as if the brakes had been applied. The energy produced goes right into the battery pack.

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The driver can control the system’s regeneration with paddles on the steering wheel, to the point where so-called one-pedal driving is possible. Much like the BMW i3, the Kona can be carefully driven without ever using the brake pedal.

There are three selectable drive modes: normal, sport and eco. Normal enhances the regenerative braking and eco shuts down some systems like the heating and air conditioning to extend battery life. Sport puts more power on tap, similar to higher engine revs on a gasoline-engine vehicle.

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Though there’s an onboard charger and a cord to plug into a standard 110-volt household outlet, it’s not anybody’s first choice because it would take a couple of days to get a full charge from a depleted battery pack. Better to use a 240-volt Level 2 charger at home, which can do the trick in about 9.5 hours overnight. If you have access to a commercial Level 3 DC charger, you can top up the Kona’s battery pack in about an hour.
Kona EV prices start at $38,310, including the destination charge, for the SEL trim level. Others are the Limited, at $42,920 and the top-line Ultimate, tested here, at $46,520. All versions get automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection and lane departure warning with lane keeping assist.

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The Ultimate also came with blind-spot warning, rear cross traffic collision alert, DC fast charging capability, navigation system, SXM satellite and HD radio, head-up display, leather upholstery, heated and ventilated front seats, motorized glass sunroof, adaptive cruise control with stop and go, Apple Car Play and Android Auto connectivity, LED lighting and rain-sensing windshield wipers.

In the current panoply of electric sedans and crossovers, the Kona EV stands out in a group that includes the Nissan Leaf, Chevrolet Bolt and, of course, its garage-mate Kia Niro. But it also looks capable against  such higher-priced machines as the Jaguar E-Pace, Audi E-Tron and even the Tesla Model 3.

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Specifications

  • Model: 2020 Hyundai Kona Electric Ultimate four-door crossover sport utility vehicle.
  • Motor: 356-volt electric; 201 hp, 291 lb-ft torque.
  • Transmission: Single-speed direct drive automatic with front-wheel drive.
  • Overall length: 13 feet 9 inches.
  • Height: 5 feet 1 inch.
  • EPA/SAE passenger/cargo volume: 92/19 cubic feet.
  • Weight: 3,750 lbs.
  • EPA Miles Per Gallon Equivalent city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 132/108/120 MPGe.
  • Advertised range: 258 miles.
  • Base price, including destination charge: $46,295.
  • Price as tested: $46,430.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Large-36981-2020KonaElectricPhotos (c) Hyundai

2020 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid Limited: A DriveWays Review…

by Frank A. Aukofer

So the 2020 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid runs on sunshine as well as batteries and a gasoline engine. So what?

Call it groundbreaking, or unique, or perhaps a benchmark for the future. As technology advances, we’re likely to witness increasingly efficient ways of making clean power for motor vehicles.

Large-40183-2020SonataHybridIt’s not a breakthrough — yet. Solar panels have popped up all over the world as a way to reliably generate renewable clean energy. On the Sonata Hybrid, an array of solar-powered photovoltaic panels are installed on the roof under glass, right where you might find a panoramic sunroof on another car.

Electrons in the panels’ silicon cells are activated by photons of light from the sun, generating electricity. So far it doesn’t contribute a great deal to fuel economy. Hyundai of South Korea says the system can deliver 1,300 kilometers of extra electric range in a year, or about 808 miles.

That’s if you drive about six hours a day. Though the system can keep the batteries topped up, it won’t recharge them completely. Hyundai says it can recharge 30% to 60% of the batteries in a day. Juice goes into the lithium hybrid batteries as well as the 12-volt system for accessories.

Large-40154-2020SonataHybridThe Sonata Hybrid combines a 150-hp, 2.0-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine that makes 139 lb-ft of torque with a 51-hp electric motor that delivers 151 lb-ft of torque. The combined hybrid system generates 192 hp and, with the slight boost from the Solar Roof, has an EPA city/highway/combined fuel economy rating of 45/51/47 mpg.

That’s certainly not shabby for a roomy sedan that, based on its overall interior volume, sneaks into the large car category as defined by the government. Its passenger volume is 104.4 cubic feet and the trunk another 16 cubic feet, for a total of 120.4. Any car with more than 120 cubic feet of interior space is classified as large.

It drives large, too, with some of the heft and steering feel of big luxury cars. There are four driver-selectable drive modes: Custom, Sport. Eco and Smart that adjust shift points, steering feel and handling. Unlike other hybrids that use continuously variable automatic transmissions with their absence of shift points, the Sonata Hybrid uses a six-speed automatic transmission with steering-wheel mounted paddles for manual shifting.

Large-40164-2020SonataHybridLike other hybrids, the Sonata also features idle stop-start technology to enhance fuel economy. But there’s no hesitation off the line. With some other systems, especially those installed on gasoline-engine vehicles, there’s a hiccup on setting off as the engine re-starts. But on the Sonata Hybrid, the electric motor is poised to get things going with instant torque, or twisting force.

Select the Sport mode on the Sonata Hybrid Limited, punch the loud pedal and feel your torso slam into the seatback. It feels powerful and fast. Then settle down to a quiet, fuss-free ride on the freeway as the fuel gauge needle barely moves.

Though the handling on twisting roads can get a bit darting in some of the drive modes because of a somewhat irregular lane-keeping assist, there’s a solid feel and informative steering feedback in the Sport mode.

Large-40162-2020SonataHybridThere are three versions of the Sonata Hybrid: Blue, SEL and Limited. The base Blue, which is estimated to start somewhere south of $30,000, gets the best city/highway/combined fuel economy: 50/54/52 mpg. However, it does not come with the Solar Roof, which is reserved for the upper trim levels.

The tested Limited was loaded with full safety and convenience equipment: automatic emergency braking, rear cross-traffic collision avoidance, adaptive cruise control, driver drowsiness detector and a blind-spot monitor that displays photos in the instrument cluster of the right- and left-rear areas. Though informative in an emergency, the system is no substitute for proper adjustment of the outside mirrors.

Large-40163-2020SonataHybridAfter the national press introduction was canceled because of the coronavirus pandemic, a top-line Limited model was made available as a test vehicle delivered through a third-party vendor.

Price information was not immediately available, awaiting the date when Sonata Hybrids arrive at dealerships. An educated estimate, based on the prices of the gasoline-engine Sonatas and leavened by the fact that hybrids cost more to manufacture, placed the tested Limited model with a base price of about $37,500 and, with one modest option, an as-tested price of $37,635.

Large-40138-2020SonataHybridSpecifications

  • Model: 2020 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid Limited four-door sedan.
  • Engine/motor: 2.0-liter four-cylinder gasoline, 150 hp, 139 lb-ft torque; 39 kW electric motor, 51 hp, 151 lb-ft torque; with 270-volt lithium battery and hybrid starter-generator. Combined hybrid system 192 horsepower.
  • Transmission: Six-speed automatic with manual-shift mode.
  • Overall length: 16 feet 1 inch.
  • EPA/SAE passenger/trunk volume: 104/16 cubic feet.
  • Weight: 3,530 pounds.
  • EPA city/highway/combined fuel consumption: 45/51/47 mpg.
  • Estimated base price, including destination charge: $37,500.
  • Estimated price as tested: $37,635.

Disclaimer: The manufacturer provided the vehicle used to conduct this test drive and review.

Large-40182-2020SonataHybridPhotos (c) Hyundai

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